Want to bring on the heat this summer? We have a range of hot peppers to satisfy your inner daredevil! Be adventurous, try growing a pepper you’ve never had before.

Not only do they spice up dishes, they are also packed with vitamin D, vitamin C, potassium, fiber and beta-carotene.

Scoville Hot Units

Choosing the right peppers to grow, depends on how spicy you like them. Scoville Heat Units, also known as SHU is the measurement used to measure a chili pepper’s pungency and heat. The range is determined by the number of times capsaicin needs to be diluted by sugar-water. The higher the number, the hotter the pepper.

Steps to Success

1

Planting

Ready to grow some peppers? Hot peppers can be planted directly into a garden bed or in containers with good drainage. Space the plants 2-3 ft. apart and use a stake or cage to give it support. It’s best to prepare the soil, prior to planting, with hen manure or worm castings.

2

Maintenance

Hot peppers generally prefer drier soil conditions, you will need to water when the soil feels dry about 1-2 inches below the surface. You can fertilize with All Gro several times throughout the growing season to give the plants an extra boost.

3

Harvesting

Peppers will be ready about 65-95 days from planting and once they’ve reached their mature colour. You can wear gloves or use shears to avoid unwanted burning. There are several ways you can use your newly harvested peppers! They work well in soups, sauces, chilli’s and many more recipes.

4

Storing

Don’t let your hard work in the garden go to waste! Freezing or drying your peppers will extend their life by many days.

Freezing Peppers

By freezing your peppers, the heat and flavour will be preserved if you freeze them right away. To freeze peppers, follow these instructions below.

Step 1 – Wash

Thoroughly wash and dry your peppers in lukewarm water.

Step 2 – Dry

You want to make sure you dry your peppers thoroughly with a paper towel in order to remove all moisture. Otherwise, they will stick together when frozen.

Step 3 – Plan

You can either freeze your peppers whole or dice them into smaller pieces to make it easier to use in the future. Either way works, it depends on how you plan on using them.

Step 4 – Store

Store your peppers in an airtight freezer bag. You want to ensure you remove as much air as possible before sealing the bag closed. Peppers can last up to 9 months if stored properly!


Drying Peppers

Drying peppers is a very popular way to preserve so you continue enjoying them. You can use dried peppers in many aspects of cooking! There are two methods for drying peppers below.

Air Drying Method

  1. Thoroughly was and dry your peppers to remove any dirt.
  2. Keep them whole, you will need the stems in order to hang them.
  3. Choose a method for hanging the peppers, either use a long needle and thread to string the peppers together, or you can tie a string around the stems. Make sure you leave enough room between each pepper for airflow between.
  4. Hang the peppers in direct sunlight.
  5. It will take 3-4 weeks until your peppers are fully dried. You can then store them in jars for easy access.

Oven Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 120F degrees.
  2. Thoroughly was and dry your peppers to remove any dirt.
  3. Cut peppers in half length-wise, and arrange them on a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  4. Place in the oven.
  5. It could take 1-3 hours for the peppers to completely dry out depending on the size of the pepper. Ensure you turn them every now and then to prevent burning.

Once your peppers are dried out, you can keep them whole and rehydrate down the line, throw them into stews/chillies or you can grind them and sprinkle them on food. No matter what method you choose, you will be able to bring the heat all season long!


Hot Sauce Recipes

Another great way to use your peppers is to make a hot sauce! This is a great way to use your fresh peppers. If you end up making too much sauce, they make great cost effective gifts!

Here are some quick recipes for you to try!

15 Min Homemade Hot Sauce

Homemade Jalapeño Hot Sauce

Preparation

Your new plants should be installed as soon as possible. If there is some delay in planting, then it is important to guard against moisture loss. Store plants in a shady, wind protected area, and keep the root area evenly moist.
Handle plants gently and use the container or root ball to move the plant. Never hold onto the plant itself. Be sure to place your plants in their preferred growing environment for best results.

Balled and Burlap

Many trees, shrubs and evergreens have the root ball wrapped in burlap and secured with string or rope. Large sizes have the ball contained in a wire basket.
These must be planted just the way they are, burlap, rope and wire basket too. Fill around the ball with a good soil mix to three-quarters and water thoroughly.
Then – untie all string or rope from the trunk or stems. Fold back burlap and ropes and tuck down out of sight. If there is a wire basket, fold back the loops and push down, leaving the wire basket on. Add more good soil mix to fill the hole. Water again using a root-stimulating transplant fertilizer.

Size of Planting Hole

It is vital to dig your planting hole at least 12 cm larger than the root ball on all sides to allow for soil enrichments before planting. When planting large heavy balls, the soil at the bottom of the hole should be left solid to prevent the tree from settling lower . The finished level of the tree should be the same as it was grown, or up to 8 cm higher.

Fibre Pots

We can not over stress the importance of leaving the pot ON! These pots are made of paper and will rot away in the soil, and are readily penetrable by healthy plant roots. Break off the pot rim down to the soil level. Make three cuts halfway up from the bottom. DO NOT remove the bottom of the pot. Fill in around the pot with a good soil mix. Water thoroughly with a root stimulating transplant fertilizer.

Plastic Pots

Water thoroughly before removing the container. If a light tapping on sides and bottom does not release the soil, make two cuts the length of the pot on opposite sides and gently pull away the halves. Use your fingers or a knife to gently loosen and spread exposed roots that appear crowded. To free matted or circling roots, make several vertical cuts 13 mm to 2.5 cm deep through the root mass.

Planting in Clay Soils

To ensure vital good drainage when planting in clay soils, simply enlarge the size of the hole and raise the level of the planting area 5-8 cm above the surrounding grade

Special Care for Special Plants

Roses may be in fibre or plastic pots. Most roses are grafted on to different root stock. For reasons of hardiness, the grafted area (which will be the swollen area where the stems originate) must be planted 5 cm below the soil. For Rhododendrons, Azaleas and other Broadleafed Evergreens , increase the amount of sphagnum peat moss used by half. Peaches, nectarine s and cherries demand excellent fast drainage. DO NOT plant in wet areas. DO NOT overwater.

Watering

Plants grown in plastic pots tend to dry out more quickly, therefore, more frequent watering may be necessary to avoid plant wilt. It takes several weeks for roots to extend beyond the original soil ball, so be sure to check this area as it often dries out faster than surrounding garden soil. Deep watering encourages a deep root system and your plant will become more drought tolerant.

Mulching

Apart from their good appearance and the retarding of weed growth, mulches help to retain moisture. Mulch also keeps roots cool in summer and insulated in winter. Maintenance is easier and your plants will thrive.

1
Prepare the soil, dig a shallow channel about 1cm deep and pour in seeds generously. You will thin the plants out later.
2
For potted plants, dig a planting hole about 2-3 times larger than the pot. Place the plant in, backfill halfway, water, then fill the remainder of the hole.
3
Water seedlings daily, transplants also need frequent watering until the roots are established. Generally, if the soil feels dry 3-4 inches below the surface then it’s time to water.
4
Carefully inspect your new plant and remove any dead or wilting leaves. Aside from that, newly planted trees and shrubs need no pruning.
5
Congrats on your beautiful garden! Maintaining your garden requires watering, pulling weeds, removing dead vegetation and destructive insects. But remember to stop and smell the roses, or whatever you’re growing!

Steps to Success

1

Planting

Ready to grow some peppers? Hot peppers can be planted directly into a garden bed or in containers with good drainage. Space the plants 2-3 ft. apart and use a stake or cage to give it support. It’s best to prepare the soil, prior to planting, with hen manure or worm castings.

2

Maintenance

Hot peppers generally prefer drier soil conditions, you will need to water when the soil feels dry about 1-2 inches below the surface. You can fertilize with All Gro several times throughout the growing season to give the plants an extra boost.

3

Harvesting

Peppers will be ready about 65-95 days from planting and once they’ve reached their mature colour. You can wear gloves or use shears to avoid unwanted burning. There are several ways you can use your newly harvested peppers! They work well in soups, sauces, chilli’s and many more recipes.

4

Storing

Don’t let your hard work in the garden go to waste! Freezing or drying your peppers will extend their life by many days.

Annuals are those plants whose life cycle is completed within a single season. The seed germinates, the plants bloom, set seed and then die ñ from spring to the following autumn. Owing to their short life span, annuals allow you to experiment and express yourself anew each year.

Colour

Annuals should be planted so that they complement the plants around them, for example, mauve or orchid-coloured Petunias in front of a yellow-flowering potentilla shrub, low-growing white Alyssum interplanted with blue Forget-me nots, or blue Ageratum and yellow Calendula surrounding red Salvia.

Light Requirements

The bulk of annuals prefer sunny locations but the following list will help you choose plants for all areas of your garden.

Sun

  • Ageratum
  • Alyssum
  • Asters
  • Carnation
  • Celosia
  • Coleus
  • Dahlia
  • Dusty Miller
  • Geraniums
  • Marigolds
  • Morning Glory
  • Petunias
  • Portulaca
  • Salvia
  • Snapdragons
  • Sunshine Impatiens
  • Verbena
  • Zinnia

Semi-Shade

  • Ageratum
  • Alyssum
  • Begonias
  • Browallia
  • Coleus
  • Dusty Miller
  • Geraniums
  • Impatiens
  • Lobelia
  • Marigolds
  • Morning Glory
  • Nicotiana
  • Pansy
  • Petunias
  • Salvia
  • Snapdragons
  • Vinca

Shade

  • Begonias
  • Browallia
  • Coleus
  • Fuchsia
  • Impatiens
  • Lobelia

Grouping

Annuals, often referred to as bedding plants, show themselves best when planted in groups rather than individually. Even when planting on a small scale, use a minimum of three plants and try to plant so that each group overlaps with the one beside it, creating a unified flow rather than isolated spots of colour.

Height

In designing your garden, keep in mind that annuals offer a tremendous range of heights accommodating virtually any area in your yard. Here is a small but representative sampling of the possibilities:

Evening Scented Stock                     38 cm

Fibrous-rooted Begonia                    25 cm

Geraniums                                         36 cm

Dwarf Impatiens                               18 cm

Lobelia                                                13 cm

Petunia                                               25 cm

Sweet Alyssum                                  10 cm

Ageratum Blue Blazer                       15 cm

Browallia                                            30 cm

Butterfly Snapdragons                     75 cm

Celosia plumosa                                45 cm

Dahlia-flowering Zinnias                  90 cm

Dusty Miller                                       20 cm

Dwarf Marigolds                               20 cm

How to Plant Annuals

1

Prepare the flower bed to a depth of 30 cm, using good soil, composted manure and peat moss, all well mixed.

2

Gently loosen the roots of each plant as you remove them from the cell-pack

3

Water thoroughly and fertilize each plant with 5-15-5 plant starter.

4

Keep the bed well watered for the first two weeks until the plants are rooted.Then water once a week with a soluble fertilizer, 20-20-20 or 15-30-15.

5

In choosing and placing your annuals, consider their need for sun or shade.

6

Should the floral display diminish, pinch the plants by nipping or cutting the stems back. In a week or so your plants will look better than ever. Do this before going on vacation and your garden will delight you when you return.

Useful Tip

Planning

First, make a list of all the vegetables your family enjoys (there is no use growing a vegetable if it won’t get eaten). Then, put a number beside each variety indicating the number of plants required to feed you and your family.

Find an area, which will receive at least five to six hours of direct sunlight daily. Take into consideration: the amount of space you have available (some vegetables need more growing room than others); your own requirements for canning, freezing or table use; local frost dates and climate conditions. For a longer harvest period, plant vegetables at staggered time intervals. Allocate part of your garden for small, rapid-maturing vegetables (such as radishes, lettuce, spinach). Keep tall vine or pole varieties from overshadowing smaller plants.

The following plants should be started from seed:
beans
beets
carrots
corn
peas
radishes

When growing plants from seed, follow the instructions on the seed pack.

Soil Preparation

Spade soil deeply. Loosen up heavy clay by adding peat moss and manure. Add 1 kg of garden fertilizer per 10 square metres. Turn the soil over again and rake smoothly.

Planting

Moisten soil before planting, allowing it to dry slightly until it is workable. Generally, plant seeds about three times as deep as their diameter. Cover small seeds with finely sifted compost, soil or vermiculite. Plants not in individual containers should be gently separated to retain as much soil around the roots as possible.

Watering

Vegetables are thirsty! Water them thoroughly with a mild fertilizer to give them a good start. Thereafter, water whenever the soil begins to dry. Water early in the day by soaking the soil. Do not just sprinkle the foliage with water.

After Planting Care

Cultivate out weeds as soon as they appear. For easier weed pulling, moisten soil an hour before cultivating. When removing weeds, do not disturb the roots of the plants. Your vegetables may have problems with insects or disease. If they do, bring a sample of the problem to your closest garden centre and let one of our experienced nursery men identify the problem.

Landscape Ontario Horticultural Trades Association represents the leading garden centres in Ontario. As one of the select garden centres which has achieved “Approved Member” status, we assure our customers receive a high level of service, a good range of quality plants and associated products, together with professional advice and information.